Self-Productivity and Complementarities in Human Development: Evidence from the Mannheim Study of Children at Risk

Discussion und Working Paper
Discussion und Working Paper

Self-Productivity and Complementarities in Human Development: Evidence from the Mannheim Study of Children at Risk

This paper investigates the role of self-productivity and home resources in capability formation from infancy to adolescence. In addition, we study the complementarities between basic cognitive, motor and noncognitive abilities and social as well as aca-demic achievement. Our data are taken from the Mannheim Study of Children at Risk (MARS), an epidemiological cohort study following the long-term outcome of early risk factors. Results indicate that initial risk conditions cumulate and that dif-ferences in basic abilities increase during development. Self-productivity rises in the developmental process and complementarities are evident. Noncognitive abilities promote cognitive abilities and social achievement. There is remarkable stability in the distribution of the economic and socio-emotional home resources during the early life cycle. This is presumably a major reason for the evolution of inequality in human development.

Dorothea, Blomeyer, Katja Coneus, Laucht Manfred und Friedhelm Pfeiffer (2008), IZA Discussion Paper No. 3734, Bonn

Autoren/-innen Blomeyer Dorothea // Katja Coneus // Laucht Manfred // Friedhelm Pfeiffer