ZEW summer courses are advanced PhD courses that will be offered as part of the elective courses in the CDSE course catalogue. They are open to CDSE and ZEW PhD students. They usually take place in July or August of each year and are given as a block course.

Course Registration Information

Please register via summercourses@zew.de mentioning the course(s) you want to take by specifying for each course either A) course is taken for credit, i.e. with grading and assignment of ECTS credits, or B) course is taken for audit only, i.e. without grading and assignment of ECTS credits.

Final registration deadline is May 30, 2020.

Course details will be provided in due course after the registration deadline.

ZEW Summer Courses 2020

Revealed Preferences

Revealed Preferences

LECTURER
Nicolai Kuminoff, Arizona State University

Course Type: elective

Credits: 5 ECTS

Grading and assignment of ECTS credits: Grades will be based on two activities.

  1. Students will present a working paper (which they may or may not have written) and explain its use of revealed preference analysis.
  2. Students will submit a written “referee report” summarizing strengths and limitations of a working paper that uses revealed preference analysis.

SCHEDULE
Date of the Course: June 29 – July 7, 2020

PREREQUISITES
All first year CDSE or equivalent courses.

COURSE CONTENT
Economic agents sort themselves across markets according to their heterogeneous preferences and constraints. This sorting process can reveal information about consumer preferences that can be used to evaluate past policies and design new ones. This course will illustrate how to use the properties of market equilibria, together with information on the observed characteristics and behavior of economic agents, to estimate parameters that characterize agents’ preferences and welfare. Topics will include hedonic price functions, discrete choice models of consumer decision making, and current best practices in econometric identification. Applications will include markets for housing, labor, and health care in which consumers reveal their preferences for private goods as well as for nonmarket features of environmental quality.

Competences acquired: Students will learn how to combine theory and data to infer consumer preferences from observed behavior and then use this information to evaluate actual and counterfactual policies.  Students will develop the skills needed to apply revealed preference methods in their own research in ways that incorporate best practices in econometric identification and economic interpretation.

Further information (literature and recommended textbooks):
Recommended textbooks:

  1. Manski. “Identification for Prediction and Decision”
  2. Train. “Discrete Choice Methods with Simulation”
  3. Angrist and Pischke. “Mostly Harmless Econometrics”
  4. Bockstael and McConnell. “Environmental and Resource Valuation with Revealed Preferences”

Literature: A detailed reading list will be announced prior to the course.

Applied Theory for Empiricists

Applied Theory for Empiricists

LECTURER
Nicolas Schutz, Universität Mannheim

Course Type: elective

Credits: 5 ECTS

Grading and assignment of ECTS-credits: Paper presentation (50%), referee report (50%)

SCHEDULE
Date of the Course: Lectures: July 14 – 17, 2020 Students’ presentations: First or second Friday of September 2020

PREREQUISITES
All first year CDSE or equivalent courses.

COURSE CONTENT
This course will cover simple microeconomic models that can be used to derive testable predictions, motivate empirical specifications, and explain empirical findings. We will cover a number of recent papers in industrial organization and international trade that have relied on combining applied-theoretical modelling with reduced-form empirical evidence. A reading list will be communicated at a later stage.

Competences acquired: Students are able to build simple micro models and use them as building blocks for empirical work.

Further information (literature and recommended textbooks): Literature will be announced prior to the course.

Causal Machine Learning

Causal Machine Learning

LECTURER
Michael Lechner, Universität St. Gallen

Course Type: elective

Credits: 5 ECTS

Grading and assignment of ECTS-credits:
Class participation (30%)
Group project presentations (via Skype, about 2 weeks after the course)

SCHEDULE
Date of the Course: August 10 – 14, 2020

PREREQUISITES
All first year CDSE or equivalent courses. Standard graduate econometrics.

COURSE CONTENT
The course has three parts. In the first part, we discuss the use of machine and statistical learning methods for predicting outcomes. In the second part, we focus on the most popular causal research designs used in econometrics, like selection-on-observables, IV, regression-discontinuity and difference-in-difference. The third part concerns causal machine learning, i.e. how to combine the prediction methods of the machine learning literature with the causal research designs to obtain reliable causal inference in empirical studies.

Competences acquired: Students will obtain a basic knowledge of several popular machine/statistical learning methods, of the most important research designs, and how to combine both to obtain reliable and robust causal inference. They will be able to use these methods to conduct own empirical studies with causal machine learning methods.

Further information (literature and recommended textbooks): Literature will be announced prior to the course.

Identification Strategies

Identification Strategies

LECTURER
David A. Jaeger, University of St. Andrews

Course Type: elective

Credits: 5 ECTS

SCHEDULE
Date of the Course: August 17 – 20, 2020

PREREQUISITES
All first year CDSE or equivalent courses.

COURSE CONTENT
This is an introduction to some of the ways that econometricians think about identifying causal effects in observational (i.e. non-experimental) data. We will examine several of the standard ways of estimating causal effects in the presence of potentially unobserved confounding factors. We will also discuss how to make proper statistical inferences about those estimates. Both theoretical and applied work will be examined.

Competences acquired:

·       Familiarity with econometric methods used for causal inference.

·       Ability to evaluate and critique existing empirical research that uses causal inference methods.

·       Identify and apply appropriate causal inference methods in students’ own research.

Further information (literature and recommended textbooks): The primary books for the class are “Mostly Harmless Econometrics” by Joshua Angrist and Jörn-Steffen Pischke (Princeton University Press, 2008), denoted by AP in the list of readings; and Microeconometrics: Methods and Applications” by Colin Cameron and Pravin K. Trivedi (Cambridge University Press, 2005), denoted by CT on the reading list. Other readings will be available on Zotero.

The Economics of Migration

The Economics of Migration

LECTURER
David A. Jaeger, University of St. Andrews

Course Type: elective

Credits: 5 ECTS

SCHEDULE
Date of the Course: August 24 – 27, 2020

PREREQUISITES
All first year CDSE or equivalent courses.

COURSE CONTENT
This course examines the most important areas in the economics of migration and immigration. 
Prospective topics include:

·       The migration decision and Immigrant selectivity

·       Cohort quality and assimilation

·       Immigrants location choices; Enclaves and language

·       Immigrants’ impact on natives’ labor market outcomes

·       Intergenerational mobility

·       Fiscal impacts, prices, and innovation

Competences acquired:

·       Familiarity with the models and data used in migration research.

·       Understanding of the empirical strategies used to overcome substantial endogeneity issues in the migration literature.

·       Ability to evaluate and critique new research in the economics of migration.

Further information (literature and recommended textbooks): Background reading will be drawn from “Economics of Migration” by George Borjas (Harvard University Press 2014). Articles will be drawn from the “classic” and recent literature and discussed in class.

Please see the CDSE course catalogue for courses offered by the CDSE during the Spring Term 2020.

Kontakt

Researcher und Graduate Study Coordinator

Tel.: +49 (0)621 1235-398

martin.ungerer@zew.de